Canadian Customs Broker Blog | Page 16 | Clearit.ca

You’re Being Audited. Are You Ready?

Fail to prepare, prepare to fail. No matter what kind of business you are, if you are importing or exporting goods, you should be prepared for the likely situation that you will be audited. The Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA) audit will cover tariff classification, duties, verification of origin, and free trade agreements. There are 2 different kinds of CBSA audits: randomly selected, or a targeted verification. In both cases, the au...

What Is An ITN/AES Number? Why Do I Need One?

  If your company exports goods that are valued at more than $2,500, you’re probably acquainted with US Foreign Trade Regulations. These regulations require you to file your export information through the Automated Export System (AES). A misstep in filing can waste time and money -- so having a thorough understanding of the system is crucial to your business practices. The Automated Export System is an electronic system used to ...

Canada’s Free Trade Agreements: The Run-Down

What is Canada’s stance on free trade? As Canada’s total trade is worth approximately two-thirds of its GDP, the nation is typically described as a “trading nation” or “export-oriented economy”. 75% of that total trade is done within countries that are a part of active Free Trade Agreements with Canada. Today, Canada has 13 free trade agreements in force with various countries. By far, Canada’s most beneficial agreement i...

How you can use TPL to your advantage – Tariff Preference Levels

So, what is TPL exactly? TPL or Tariff Preference Levels are preferential quotas outlined in NAFTA. As it stands, the NAFTA Rules of Origin only allow apparel made in North America and Mexico from fabrics made in the prior-mentioned territories to qualify for free tariffs. Goods that are TPL-eligible are goods that do not meet the requirements for these Rules of Origin. However, these goods can still get the same tariff treatment (up to...

How does CETA benefit Canada?

The Canada and European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) sets new standards for the trade of goods and services and investment. CETA opens up new markets in the European Union for Canadian businesses and creates significant advantages for all Canadians. For context, the EU is Canada’s second largest trading partner (the first being the US), and the world’s second-largest economy. Needless to say, the agreement ea...