Canadian Customs Broker Blog | Page 12 | Clearit.ca

Brexit Is Already Hurting UK Companies.

Talks of Brexit seem to have somewhat cooled down since the 2016 vote. If you somehow haven’t heard of it, Brexit refers to the the British Exit from the European Union. The United Kingdom’s decision to part ways with the EU was finalized after a majority Leave vote won during the June 23 referendum in 2016. Almost a year later, on March 29, 2017, Prime Minister Theresa May submitted an official two-year leave notice to the EU. As of Marc...

Canada says it will tighten arms exports

Where do the weapons come from that are used in armed conflict and human rights abuses around the world? It is likely they’ve been exported from the United States, the number one arms exporter in the world, or Russia, who comes in second. But they could have similarly been exported from Canada, who ranks as the fifteenth international arms exporter. Canada’s Minister of Foreign Affairs, Chrystia Freeland, wants Canada to hold itself to a ...

What Is The Difference Between LTL and FTL?

In front of you is a shipment eagerly awaiting delivery to a lucky customer. One obstacle stands in your way as you ask yourself, “Do I ship Less Than Truckload or Full Truckload?!” Every decision you make while getting your products from point A to point B is an important one in determining your business’ success. This step in the process breaks down into only two options - phew! LTL Shipping Defined When using ground freight ...

Our Guide To Amazon Referral Fees

Being an Amazon Seller means giving away a share of your revenue in exchange for access to the vast consumer base that Amazon continues to cultivate. Amazon’s Marketplace Selling Fees are a small price to pay for the exposure that your business receives. Making up these selling fees are three main components: Variable Closing Fees, the $0.99 Per Item fee, and finally the Referral Fee. Whether you run your Amazon business under the Professio...

Feeling Hungover? Canadian Spirits Exports Falling

The export of spirits such as whiskey, vodka, rum, gin and tequila is an important source of income for Canada. In comparison to 2016, the past year saw a fall in Canadian spirits exports by a whopping 5.1%. Taking into consideration that spirits account for a larger percent of export than beer, cider and wine combined is cause for concern, especially when we are talking about millions of dollars. So what caused the drop in exports, if not th...