Canadian Customs Broker Blog | Clearit.ca

Importing Wood Into Canada

In Canada, wood imports are regulated by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Any wooden products going in and out of Canada will be inspected and reviewed by the Canadian Border Patrol. So if you’re interested in importing wood into Canada, you’ll need to know some of the basics to make sure your efforts go off without a hitch. Importing wood into Canada Canadians are free to import many wood products for personal and commercial use...

The Consumer Packaging and Labelling Act

When importing items into Canada, it’s usually required that they’re marked and labelled properly. Many of our clients ask “How do I do this?” and “What’s the difference, anyway?”. It can be pretty important to know the answers to those questions. To help you avoid penalties and wasted time at the border, we’ve put together an introductory guide to the labelling requirements of Canada. Marking: You might have already heard that ...

Why You Should Import: The Best Reasons for Importing Goods

You may have considered importing, only to ask yourself “why should I?”. It’s a very reasonable question, especially when you’re used to purchasing things available at a local supplier. However, you should always be looking for ways to better your operations and sometimes that means going outside of the box and seeing what’s available beyond your local supplier. We’ve got a list of three compelling reasons to help you decide if import...

Travelling Abroad: Duty on Alcohol and Tobacco into Canada

How much alcohol can I bring back to Canada? If you are a Canadian citizen and have been outside of the country for at least 48 hours, you are duty and tax exempt for the following amounts when bringing alcohol into Canada: 1.14 L (40 oz.) of liquor; or 1.5 L of wine (53 oz.); or 24 X 355 ml (12 oz.) containers of beer. How much tobacco can I bring back to Canada? If you are a Canadian citizen and have been outside of the country fo...

A Beginner’s Guide To AMPS Penalties

Importing and exporting goods is rarely as simple as putting a stamp and a destination on your package. There are rules and regulations that all Canadians must adhere to when shipping items over the border, and the AMPS penalties are what the CBSA uses to penalize those who don’t. The practice of following these rules is usually referred to as customs compliance. If you’re a regular importer or exporter, customs compliance practices are vital...