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Trade Compliance: 5 New Orders & Regulations for CUSMA

In continuing our series about CUSMA/USMCA/T-MEC, we’re taking a closer look at the orders and regulations published through the Canadian Government in the Canada Gazette at the end of July.  It’s been a little over a month since CUSMA’s official enactment, for which we’ve been covering various elements that those in the logistics/supply chain space need to be apprised of. For example, here are the pieces we’ve put out on the topic:...

Transitioning to CUSMA: A Toolkit for Importers

In preparation for CUSMA (or USMCA/T-MEC), we’ve put out many resources to help Canadians trade professionals -- or all North Americans in general -- adapt their practices. While the shift away from NAFTA caused some anxiety in the industry, it’s a trade agreement that proves to have some clear advantages over the previous one.  For those just becoming aware of this agreement, CUSMA is a free trade agreement between Canada, the United Sta...

The Benefits of CUSMA for SMEs

Last month, CUSMA/USMA/T-MEC was officially enacted. This FTA can also be referred to as the “New NAFTA”.  (Read about it here: CUSMA/USMCA: Meet The New NAFTA and CUSMA: Rules Of Origin & Certifying Origin) In a survey conducted by DHL Express, International Trade Impact and Outlook, of over 2000 small and medium-sized companies, about 50% states that the pandemic made them more wary of global trade. Additionally and unfortunately...

All About “Reason to Believe” Deadlines

What is a “Reason to Believe” deadline?  As defined in Memorandum D11-6-6, refers to the case in which incorrect information provided for an imported shipment (origin, classification, value of duty, etc.) are deemed believable and not the fault of the importer. In this scenario, the importer or broker may submit the corrections to the documentation within a 90-day period.  On the deadline, the memorandum states: “For example, the dat...

Importers & Remote Work: Mistakes To Watch Out For

Most working professionals are doing their work from a home office, as a result of current times. Importers (and many other people across the logistics sector) are no exception to this, as stipulated by government directives.  As such, importers must be hyper-vigilant in order to prevent mistakes. As trade law & sales tax firm lawyer, Cyndee Todgham Cherniak, states: “[...] Business is not as usual. Importers have to adjust [...]. Most...